Respiration Training BIOFEEDBACK

Respiration is driven by the autonomic nervous system, and most of the time breathing occurs unconsciously.


post covid breathing biofeedback neurofeedback
Respiration Training

When stress levels rise, the sympathetic nervous system becomes active and one might tend to acquire a dysfunctional breathing pattern, like overbreathing. With breathing therapy a client can become aware of the breathing pattern and change dysfunctional breathing patterns to promote improved homeostatic and generative processes.


How is it measured?

To measure respiration, we usually place a respiration sensor over the abdomen, as this is associated with relaxed breathing. With every breath, the sensor measures the relative expansion and contraction of the belly. Measure abdominal or thoracical breathing rate and relative depth of breathing.


The Respiration Sensor measures breathing rate and relative depth of abdominal or thoracic breathing. It is provided with an easy to apply elastic band and can be worn over clothing. The Respiration Sensor is usually placed over the abdomen. Respiration is often used in combination with the Blood Volume Puls Sensor for HRV Training. The Respiration Sensor offers easy strap system and can easily be worn over clothing.

Blood Volume Pulse Sensor, BVP
Blood Volume Pulse Sensor, BVP

The BVP Sensor, also called Blood Volume Pulse Sensor, can be used to measure the relative change in blood flow resulting from contraction of the heart. In other words vasoconstriction and vasodilatation. It uses light-based technology, also known as a PPG (photoplethysmography). Combine with respiration for Heart Rate Variability (HRV) training. BVP is a very efficient way of quickly measuring heart rate and relative bloodflow. For a more precise measurement of heart rate, it is recommended to apply an ECG with the ExG Sensor. The Pulse/HR Sensor offers easy finger clip-on mechanism.


Blood Volume Pulse Sensor BVP
Blood Volume Pulse Sensor, BVP

An electrocardiography (ECG) is the electro-physiological measurement of the heart muscle signal. An ECG is suitable for measuring the heart rate and the regularity of heartbeats (heart rate variability or HRV). A typical ECG tracing of the cardiac cycle (heartbeat) consists of a P wave, a QRS complex and a T wave. The R-peak indicates the contraction phase (of the ventricles). The distance between the R-peaks (the interbeat interval (IBI)) defines the heart rate (HR). ECG can be measured by placing the electrodes on the left and the right wrist or by a vertical chest placement.


During each heartbeat, the heart contracts and pumps blood through the arteries and blood vessels. During each contraction tiny bits of electrical charge are produced, which can be recorded with electrodes placed at the surface of the skin. The resulting ECG (ElectroCardioGram) is a non-invasive method for measuring heart rate.


The electrical waveform of the ECG shows the multiple steps during each heartbeat. At rest, each heart muscle cell has a negative charge. Decreasing this negative charge towards zero is called depolarization, which activates the mechanisms in the cell that cause it to contract.

A typical ECG tracing of the cardiac cycle (heartbeat) consists of a P wave, a QRS complex and a T wave. The R-peak indicates the contraction phase of the ventricles of the heart. The distance between the R-peaks (the interbeat interval (IBI)) defines the heart rate (HR).